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Bats of the Kootenai National Forest, Montana 



A Report to: 

USDA Forest Service 

Kootenai National Forest 

506 U.S. Highway 2 West 

Libby, Montana 59923 



Submitted by 

Paul Hendricks, Katharine A. Jurist, David L. Genter 

and 
James D. Reichel 

December 1996 

Montana Natural Heritage Program 
1515 East Sixth Avenue 

P.O. Box 201800 
Helena, MT 59620-1800 



®1996 Montana Natural Heritage Program 

This document should be cited as follows: 

Hendricks, P., K. A. Jurist, D. L. Genter, and J. D. Reichel. 1996. Bats of the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 
Montana Natural Heritage Program. Helena, MT. 99 pp. 



11 



I 



ABSTRACT 

Bats of the Kootenai National Forest, Montana were surveyed with ultrasonic detectors during 
145 detector-nights at 134 sites in July, August, and September 1995, supplementing similar 
efforts in 1994 (54 sites total). Twenty sites were also sampled with mist nets. Many of the sites 
surveyed were within 200 m of water (rivers, streams, beaver ponds, marshes), but less than 40% 
of the sites were actually abutting wetland habitat. Most sites surveyed were in stands of mixed 
conifers, and special effort was made to sample in old-growth and mature forest. Twelve mine 
adits at six sites were also investigated for bat use. 

Bats were detected during 96 detector-nights at 93 sites in 1995, supplementing detections at 
40 sites in 1994. Bats were more likely to be detected in old-growth and mature forest stands 
than in "disturbed" (i.e., seed-tree cut, clearcut, and burned sites, of recent to pole-sapling stages) 
stands in 1995. The pattern was similar for bat detector data from 1994 and 1995 combined. 
Much of the pattern between the presence of bats and forest-stand structure was attributable to 
Myotis sp.; the difference was not statistically significant for any identifiable bat species except 
M. evotis, although all species were equally or more often detected in older, less-disturbed stands. 
The presence and activity level of bats in riparian sites was about equal to that in old- 
growth/mature forest stands. 

Eight bat species were identified in 1995: Myotis calif ornicus, M. evotis, M. volans, M. 
yumanensis, Lasionycteris noctivagans, Eptesicusfuscus, Lasiurus cinereus, and Corynorhinus 
(=Plecotus) townsendii. M. yumanensis was previously undocumented for the Kootenai National 
Forest. Most Myotis species cannot be distinguished from one another with bat detectors, the 
survey tool most frequently used in 1995; unidentified Myotis were detected at 82 sites. As many 
as six species (M yumanensis, M. thysanodes, M. lucifugus, M. volans, M. californicus, and M. 
ciliolabrum) may have been present and included in this grouping. Field surveys with mist nets 
(previously in 1993, and during the 1995 field season) revealed the presence of all but Myotis 
thysanodes in the above group of Myotis species on the Kootenai National Forest, and also 
documented M. evotis and Lasionycteris noctivagans. Myotis sp., M. evotis, Lasionycteris 
noctivagans and Eptesicusfuscus were detected on all six Districts of the Kootenai National 
Forest in 1995. Five or six species were identified on all Districts in 1995 except the Fortine 
District, with only three species. 

Combined results from the 1993, 1994 and 1995 surveys showed the presence often species 
of vespertilionid bat on the Kootenai National Forest. Currently, all ten species have been 
documented only on the Cabinet District, but six species (M. evotis, M. lucifugus, Lasionycteris 
noctivagans, Eptesicusfuscus, Lasiurus cinereus, Corynorhinus townsendii) have been detected 
on all Forest Districts. 

Little is known about the reproductive activities of bats on the Kootenai National Forest, but 
ten species (M yumanensis, M. lucifugus, M. evotis, M. volans, M. californicus, M. ciliolabrum, 
Lasionycteris noctivagans, Eptesicusfuscus, Lasiurus borealis, and Corynorhinus townsendii) 
may breed on Forest Service land. Overwinter occurrence and distribution of bats on the 
Kootenai National Forest remain virtually unknown. 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ABSTRACT iii 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS v 

INTRODUCTION 1 

METHODS 2 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 5 

Bat Detector Surveys 5 

Table 1. Forest bat presence in old-growth/mature stands and "disturbed" stands 

7 

Table 2. Forest bat presence in old-growth/mature and riparian stands 8 

Mist-net and Mine Surveys 9 

Summary 9 

Species Present on the Kootenai National Forest 13 

California Myotis 13 

Western Small-footed Myotis 15 

Long-eared Myotis 17 

Little Brown Myotis 19 

Long-legged Myotis 21 

Yuma Myotis 23 

Silver-haired Bat 25 

Big Brown Bat 27 

Hoary Bat 29 

Townsend's Big-eared Bat 31 

Species Potentially Present on the Kootenai National Forest 32 

Fringed Myotis 32 

RECOMMENDATIONS 33 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 35 

Appendix 1 . Field forms used in bat inventories 40 

Appendix 2. Sites of ANABAT surveys 42 

Appendix 3. Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 48 

Appendix 4. Bat species presence on Districts of the Kootenai National Forest 58 



IV 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

Much of the field work in 1995 was conducted by D. Stinson, and his contribution to the total 
survey was significant. We also thank E. and K. Werner for help collecting field data in 1994, 
and D. Roemer for his efforts in 1993. G. Altaian, A. Dueker, G. Heinz, J. Hollifield, L. 
Johnson, B. Kennedy, J. Manning, J. Peterson, D. Snell, K. Snell, B. Summerfield, and L.Young 
provided additional help, advice, and interest in this survey. Thanks to J. Erickson (University of 
Washington) for help with interpretation of bat vocalization recordings. D. Dover, C. Jones, and 
S. Thweatt assisted with element occurrence and map preparation. Financial support for the 
project came from the Kootenai National Forest (U.S. Forest Service, Northern Region) and the 
Montana Natural Heritage Program (Montana State Library, Natural Resources Information 
System and The Nature Conservancy). Specimen data were obtained from the Zoological 
Museum, University of Montana, and the U. S. National Museum, Smithsonian Institution. 



f INTRODUCTION 

IBats rank behind only rodents and carnivores in mammalian diversity over much of western 
North America; this is also true for the Pacific Northwest. Ten species of insectivorous bat are 
known to occur in northwestern Montana, with the possibility that two additional species will be 
found in the region following further survey effort. Bats often occur in forested landscapes like 
those covering much of northwestern Montana, but the significance of forest structure for bats is 
only now being clarified (e.g., Christy and West 1993, Gellman and Zielinski 1996, Mattson et 
al. 1996, Perkins and Cross 1988, Thomas 1988, Thomas and West 1991, Wunder and Carey 
1996). Because timber harvest practices alter the landscape mosaic, effective management of 
bats requires knowledge of their habitat requirements. Thus, there exists a need for more 
information on the distribution and abundance of bats in western Montana, especially in forested 
landscapes. Forest managers must also direct attention to the bat fauna because Corynorhinus 
(=Plecotus) townsendii, a species present in much of the region, is on the U. S. Forest Service 
Sensitive Species list and, as such, has special legal status. 

In the summers of 1994 and 1995 a survey of bats occurring on the Kootenai National Forest 
in Flathead, Lincoln, and Sanders counties, Montana was conducted by the Montana Natural 
Heritage Program, expanding on preliminary efforts in 1993 (Roemer 1994) to determine species 
presence and distribution on the different forest Districts. The field work in 1994-1995 differed 
from the 1993 study by emphasizing the use of ultrasound detectors. Their use permitted a more 
rigorous sampling of bat activity in a variety of forested habitats. Of special interest was bat 
presence in forest stands of different structure. The current report presents the results of the 1995 
field season, with the 1994 results (Hendricks et al. 1995) subsumed herein. The survey includes 
data published previously, and should form the basis for further inventory and monitoring efforts. 



METHODS 

Historical records of bats from northwestern Montana and adjacent areas of Idaho and Canada 
were obtained from the literature (see Bibliography). These records provide data on breeding 
status, habitat use, seasonality of occurrence, and distribution. Museum records, other than those 
previously published or from northwestern Montana, are not included in this report. Collecting 
in Montana has been sporadic, and the number of bat specimens from the Kootenai National 
Forest area is minimal. 

Field work in 1994 and 1995 on the Kootenai National Forest was conducted from mid- July 
to mid-September. Ultrasound detectors were used in both years and represent the primary 
survey technique. Mist-netting was also employed in 1995, and used by Roemer (1994) in 1993. 
Thomas and West (1989) provide a general discussion of sampling methods for bats. Each 
method has strengths and weaknesses for survey work, with no single method being definitive. 
Mist-netting has the advantage of allowing in-hand identification of individuals and collection of 
data on sex and reproductive condition, neither of which are obtainable with bat detectors. Some 
bats may escape capture in nets, however, and some species present at a particular site may go 
undetected. Detectors can determine the presence of species that may be missed during 
mist-netting, but they are not without drawbacks. Call duration, time between calls, call 
structure, and call frequency can vary significantly with habitat and between individuals 
(Erickson 1993), often making species identification difficult. On the Kootenai National Forest, 
My otis evotis was the only species of My otis which could be distinguished from other members 
of the genus with accuracy using a bat detector. Ideally, a combination of mist-nets and bat 
detectors would be employed at a given site in order to obtain the most accurate picture of 
distribution. Mist-netting is time-consuming, however, and therefore permits fewer sites to be 
surveyed within the allotted time period. 

Microchiropteran bats use a variety of ultrasonic vocalizations as echolocation aids for 
navigation and prey capture. Fortuitously, a number of studies have determined that the signals 
emitted by many species of bats can be used to distinguish among species (e.g., Barclay 1986, 
Fenton and Bell 1981, Fenton et al. 1983, MacDonald e? a/. 1994). This characteristic permits 
the assessment of species-presence during inventory work through use of portable ultrasound bat 
detectors. 

ANABAT II bat detectors (Titley Electronics, Ballina, Australia) were used during the 1994 
and 1995 field seasons. These detectors are sensitive to broadband ultrasonic calls common in 
bat vocalizations (usually 20-180 kHz) . Ultrasonic signals in the range of bat vocalizations are 
captured, converted to an audible frequency (up to 10 kHz), and recorded on magnetic tape. 
Detector units (consisting of the detector, timer/tape-driver, and a voice-activated cassette tape 
recorder) were set up before dusk near bodies of water and forest openings (where bat activity 
would be expected) and left in place overnight; usually one cassette tape was sufficient to record 
activity at a single site. Detectors were sensitive to bats within a minimum range of 20 m. 
Recorded tapes were returned to the laboratory and analyzed on an IBM compatible PC using an 
ANABAT II ZCA Interface Module and software. Assignment of vocalizations to a particular 
species of bat was achieved by matching field recordings with a reference set of calls obtained 



from captured individuals, in addition to matching call characteristics with those reported in the 
literature. 

At the time detector units were placed we recorded 1) an index of sky conditions from 0-6 
(clear to showers), 2) Beaufort wind scale from 0-5 (no wind to winds 19-24 mph), and 3) 
ambient temperature (see Appendix 1). We assumed that conditions at the time units were 
placed provided an index of nocturnal conditions. 

Mist-nets were set singly or in pairs and run for 1 .5 to 2 hours beginning at dusk. Netting was 
usually conducted near a water source or where bat activity would be concentrated. Nets were 
set across creeks, beaver ponds, an open field, and a mine adit. Some mines were examined for 
bat activity, but potential roosts in caves or tree cavities were not checked, despite the presence 
of several in the region. Mine inspection included visual examination and entry if possible, use 
of ultrasound bat detectors near the portals in most cases, and use of mist-nets in one case. Use 
of detectors and nets at mines followed procedures employed at other localities. 

An attempt was made to visit the six Districts of the Kootenai National Forest (Cabinet, 
Fisher River, Fortine, Libby, Rexford, and Three Rivers) each year, but coverage was not 
uniform across all Districts. Survey sites were chosen based on accessibility and the presence of 
water nearby, as bats tend to concentrate their foraging activity over water sources where insects 
are abundant (all bats in this region are insectivorous). However, forest clearings or narrow 
corridors within forest stands were also monitored. Habitat data were collected for each site (see 
field form in Appendix 1), and an attempt was made to sample different cover types. 

Sample sizes from different habitats were too few to analyze separately other than in a broad- 
spectrum manner. Habitat data were placed into three general forest-structure categories (old- 
growth/mature, "disturbed", "other"). "Disturbed" stands comprised all recent to pole-sapling 
stages in seed-tree cut, clearcut, and burn stands, whereas the "other" category was comprised of 
habitats not encompassed by the first two categories (e.g., young forest, mixed conifer/deciduous 
stands, aspen stands, etc.). The "other" category included too few sites for use in statistical 
analyses of bat activity in forest of different structure. Each category pooled data from all forest 
types (e.g., Douglas-fir, western redcedar, western larch, ponderosa pine, Engelmann spruce, 
subalpine fir, grand fir), although most sites sampled were in mixed-conifer stands. Riparian 
sites were included as a fourth category for some comparisons with forested categories, 
particularly old-growth/mature stands. Riparian sites were located within forested areas but the 
vegetation was dominated by typical deciduous phreatophyte genera such as cottonwood 
(Populus), birch (Betula) and willow (Salix). The next level of analysis for future studies should 
be of bat presence in stands of different forest structure within a forest type. Statistical analyses, 
where used, follow standard procedures described in Sokal and Rohlf (1981), with statistical 
significance assumed when P < 0.05. 



Bat Survey Locations 
On or near the Kootenai National Forest, Montana 




1995 surveys 
pre- 1995 surveys 



Survey locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program, May 1 7, 1 996 



I 



I RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

I Bat Detector Surveys 

Species Richness- A total of 54 sites in 1994 and 134 sites in 1995 was checked for nocturnal 

I bat activity using ultrasound bat detectors: 9 sites in July, 63 in August, and 1 16 in September. 

Number of sites surveyed on each District, with years combined, was Cabinet (34), Fisher River 
(28), Fortine (32), Libby (28), Rexford (21), and Three Rivers (45) (see Appendix 2). All sites 
I were sampled with ANABAT II ultrasonic bat detectors. Bats were detected at 133 (70.7%) of 

1 the sites: 40 (74. 1 %) in 1 994, 93 (69.4%) in 1 995 . The proportion of sites where bats were 

I detected did not differ (G = 0.412, df = 1, P > 0.5) between years . 

Five species of vespertilionid bat (common names usually follow Jones et ah 1986) were 
identified using ultrasound bat detectors each year during the field surveys (see Appendix 3): 

I long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis - 28 sites), silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans - 45 

sites), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus -57 sites), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus - 13 sites), 
Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii - 36 sites). In addition, Myotis sp. was 
detected at 107 sites. 

Number of bat species detected at a site ranged from one to five (assuming Myotis sp. 
represented a single species other than M. evotis at each site where detected). One species was 
detected at 34 sites, two species at 35 sites, three species at 36 sites, four species at 17 sites, and 
five species at 1 1 sites; a mean of 2.5 ±1.2 species/site (= species richness) was detected at sites 
where bats were present during the two years. Species richness was 3.1 ± 1.3 in 1994 and 2.3 ± 
1.1 in 1995; frequency distributions of species richness differed significantly between years (G = 
13.616, df= 4, P< 0.01). 

Several explanations for the difference in species richness between years are possible. First, 
distinguishing bat calls may have been more conservative in 1995, as experience with their 
interpretation increased. We have no way to check this, so we will not discuss this possibility 
further except to note that observer bias is always present to some degree. Second, bat activity 
may have been depressed in 1995 due to some sampling artifact, such as inclement or colder 
weather on nights sampled. Neither wind nor sky conditions at the time bat detectors were 
placed differed significantly between years (G tests, P > 0.1), but ambient temperature on 
evenings sampled was significantly warmer in 1994 (mean = 20.0 + 3.2 °C in 1994, 16.2 ± 3.0 °C 
in 1995; t = 3.887, df = 40, P < 0.001); bat and night-flying insect activity may be correlated 
with nocturnal ambient temperature in northwestern Montana. Third, the array of habitats 
surveyed may have occurred in different proportions each year; greater species richness in 1994 
may have been the result of a greater proportion of samples in habitats "attractive" to a greater 
number and variety of bats. The proportion of gross habitat categories sampled (old- 
growth/mature, "disturbed", all other habitats including riparian) did not differ significantly 
between years (G = 4.566, df = 2, P > 0.1), but pooling habitats at this level could mask finer- 
scale habitat selection by bats that is biologically significant. In the absence of evidence to the 
contrary, we assume that the difference between years in species richness was a real property of 
the environment. 



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Habitat Use-Bats were detected in most habitat types, from early serai "disturbance" sites in g 

recent clearcuts and bums to mature and old-growth stands, in ponderosa pine and riparian sites 
at low elevation to Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at moderate elevation. Riparian, 
"disturbed", and old-growth/mature sites accounted for 72.3% of the 188 sites sampled with bat 
detectors, and are the only habitat categories analyzed here. Presence was not uniform across 
these habitat categories. Bat activity occurred significantly more frequently in old-growth/mature 
forest (Table 1: 71.4% of sites) than in "disturbed" forest stands (46.7% of sites). Much of the 
difference was attributable to Myotis sp., but nearly all species identifiable were found at a 
greater proportion of old-growth/mature sites (Table 1), with the exception of the silver-haired 
bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The long-eared myotis (M. evotis) was the only species where 
the difference was significant, but larger sample sizes would likely show the same pattern for the 
big-brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) and hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus). Bats appeared in equal I 

proportions of old-growth/mature and riparian sites (Table 2), except for the hoary bat (Lasiurus ™ 

cinereus), which was present at a significantly greater proportion of old-growth/mature sites (it 
was not detected in any of the 36 riparian sites). ■ 

The patterns of habitat occurrence noted on the Kootenai National Forest are similar to those 
found in other studies in western North America. Old-growth and mature forests, which have a _ 

more complex structure often show greater bat activity than younger or disturbed forest stands I 

(see Perkins and Cross 1988, Thomas 1988, Thomas and West 1991). The availability of large 
snags, a component infrequently found in young and disturbed stands, is recognized as one of the _ 

most important attributes of old-growth and mature forests for bats in western North America '( 

(Christy and West 1993, Gellman and Zielinski 1996, Mattson et al. 1996, Wunder and Carey 
1996), as large snags provide important roost sites. The lack of association of Townsend's big- 
eared bat to any forest type during this survey (Table 1 and 2) is consistent with its known habits 
of roosting in buildings, bridges, caves and mines (Christy and West 1993, Wunder and Carey 
1996). This species rarely if ever roosts in tree cavities; forests are used primarily for foraging. 
The relatively uniform occurrence of the silver-haired bat amongst old-growth/mature, 
"disturbed", and riparian sites in this survey is unusual relative to other studies (Perkins and 
Cross 1988, Thomas 1988, Campbell et al. 1996, Mattson et al. 1996) where old-growth is the 
habitat of greatest occurrence. It is not clear why our findings differ from previous studies. 

It is not surprising that activity at riparian sites was equal to that of old-growth/mature sites 
(Table 2), as bats need water, and insect activity is often high at water sources (Christy and West I 

1993). The lack of hoary bat activity in riparian sites is surprising, however, as this species ™ 

routinely roosts and forages among deciduous trees in other areas (Jones et al. 1983). Perhaps 
the riparian sites we sampled had too few large trees to be attractive. I 



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Table 1. Forest bat presence in old-growth/mature stands and "disturbed" stands (recent to pole- 
sapling seed-tree cut, clearcut, and burned) on the Kootenai National Forest, 1994-1995, 
using ANABAT unltrasound detectors. 



Species 



Old-growth/mature 



'Disturbed" 



All bats 50, 20 b 

Myotis sp. 49,21 

My otis evotis 11,59 

Lasionycteris noctivagans 14, 56 

Eptesicus fuscus 21,49 
Lasiurus cinereus 7, 63 

Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii 11,59 



14,16 


< 0.025 


12,18 


<0.01 


0,30 


< 0.005 


6,24 


>0.9 


4,26 


>0.05 


1,29 


>0.1 


4,26 


>0.5 



G test of independence. 



b n sites where detected, n sites where not detected. Total n = 70 for old-growth/mature, 30 for 
"disturbed." 



Table 2. Forest bat presence in old-growth/mature and riparian stands on the Kootenai National 
Forest, 1994-1995, using ANABAT ultrasound detectors. 



Species 



Old-growth/mature 



Riparian 



pa 



All bats 

Myotis sp. 

Myotis evotis 

Lasionycteris noctivagans 

Eptesicus fuscus 

Lasiurus cinereus 

Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii 



a G test of independence. 

b n sites where detected, n sites where not detected. Total n = 70 for old-growth/mature, 36 for 
riparian. 



50, 20 b 


27,9 


>0.5 


49,21 


26,10 


>0.5 


11,59 


5,31 


>0.5 


14,56 


11,25 


>0.1 


21,49 


16,20 


>0.1 


7,63 


0,36 


< 0.025 


11,59 


5,31 


>0.5 






Mist-net and Mine Surveys 

Mist-netting was conducted on 20 nights at 20 sites between 20 August and 22 September 
1995, and resulted in the capture of 24 bats of four species of Myotis (7 M califomicus, 9 M. 
evotis, 1 M. volans, 7 M. yumanensis). The Yuma myotis (M yumanensis) was expected but 
previously unreported for the Kootenai National Forest area. 

Twelve mine adits were investigated at 6 sites in 1995. Bats were detected at two of these; 7 
M. evotis were captured in a mist-net on 26 August at the entrance of the Double Mac Mine 
(T29N R32W S12NE) in the Libby District, and 1 Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii was 
found roosting on 8 September in the upper adit of the Snowstorm Mine (T3 IN R34W S20SW) 
in the Three Rivers District. 

Field surveys in 1993 (Roemer 1994) identified six bat species on the Kootenai National Forest 
(M. califomicus, M. ciliolabrum, M. evotis, M. lucifugus, M. volans, Lasionyctehs noctivagans). 
The capture ofM yumanensis in 1995 brings to seven the number of species captured in mist-net 
surveys on the Kootenai National Forest, and the total number of bat species found on the Forest 
to ten (Appendix 4). 

Summary 

Field surveys in 1994 and 1995 detected the presence of eight species of bats on the Kootenai 
National Forest (Appendix 4). Roemer (1994) identified six species, two of which were not 
detected during the 1994-1995 field surveys (but one of these species from the Forest was 
represented previously in museum collections). Thus, the total bat fauna documented for the 
Kootenai National Forest is ten species; four species (M califomicus, M. evotis, M. lucifugus, M. 
yumanensis) are verified with museum specimens. The ten species present are M. yumanensis, 
M. evotis, M. lucifugus, M. califomicus, M. ciliolabrum, M. volans, Lasionyctehs noctivagans, 
Eptesicusfuscus, Lasiurus cinereus, and Corynorhinus townsendii. 

Most or all species are likely to occur on all Forest Districts. Currently, ten species have been 
noted on the Cabinet District, eight on Fisher River District, six on Fortine District, eight on 
Libby District, nine on Rexford District, and seven on Three Rivers District (Appendix 4). M. 
evotis, M. lucifugus, Lasionyctehs noctivagans, Eptesicusfuscus, Lasiurus cinereus, and 
Corynorhinus townsendii have been found on all six Districts. 

All species are likely to breed on the Kootenai National Forest. Each species is known to 
breed in Canada to the north, or in western Montana to the east and south (Hoffmann and Pattie 
1968, Hoffmann etal. 1969, van Zyll de Jong 1985). Lactating females ofM califomicus, M. 
ciliolabrum, M. evotis, andM volans were captured on the Kootenai National Forest during 
summer in 1993 (Roemer 1994), and lactating M evotis were captured in 1995. Which species 
overwinter on the Kootenai National Forest is unknown. 

The Fringed Myotis {Myotis thysanodes) may also occur on the Kootenai National Forest, but 
is considered a rare breeder in western Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968, Hoffmann et al. 
1969). The Spotted Bat (Euderma maculatum) and the Pallid Bat (Antrozons pallidus) are found 
about 230 km to the west in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia (van Zyll de Jong 1985), 



and 600 km to the southeast in the Pryor Mountains (Worthington 1991), but lack of suitable arid 
habitat on the Kootenai National Forest makes their occurrence unlikely here. 

The following species accounts, unchanged from Hendricks et al. (1995) except for addition 
of data from 1995, summarize distributional and life history information for all (detected and 
potential) species on the Kootenai National Forest. Distribution maps show results of all known 
records for the Forest. Heritage Program Global (G) and State (S) rank codes range from 1 
(critically imperiled) to 5 (demonstrably secure, though possibly rare in part of the range). 



10 



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Distribution of Myotis spp. on the Kootenai National Forest 



^ 



¥* 



^ 







•r 



V 



Jv 



V" 



w 1995 data 

• 1993 & 1994 data 

^ Pre-1 993 data 

V Museum specimens 




Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



Distribution of Myotis ealifornicus on the Kootenai National Forest 




T 1995 data 
• 1 993 & 1994 data 
^ Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 



Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program September 05, 1 996 



Species Present on the Kootenai National Forest 
California Myotis (Myotis californicus) 

Description: Fur foil and long, but not glossy. Body variably light tan to nearly black. Hind foot 
small (< 8.5 mm), but ears relatively long (extending beyond the tip of the nose when 
pressed forward). Naked part of the snout is about as long as the width of the nostrils 
when viewed from above. Calcar is keeled. 

Distribution: Found from southeastern Alaska south to southern Mexico in western North 
America. 

Habitat and Habits: This species is a bat of western lowlands (usually < 1800 m elevation), often 
found associated with rock-walled canyons, from arid to humid woodlands and forests. 
Small numbers have been reported hibernating in mines and caves in Oregon, 
Washington (Perkins^ al. 1990) and British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). Summer 
roost sites include buildings, rock crevices, hollow trees, and spaces under loose bark. 
Females form small maternity colonies, sometimes with M. lucifugus (Hoffmann and 
Pattie 1968), with young born in July. Roemer (1994) captured lactating females on 16 
July on the Cabinet District and 27 August on the Fisher River District; this species was 
netted 28 August, 15 and 19 September 1995. This species emerges from roosts at sunset 
to feed until dawn. Flight is slow, erratic, and usually low near vegetation or water. 

Status: Hoffmann and Pattie (1968) and Hoffmann et al. (1969) indicate that the distribution of 
this bat in Montana is restricted to valleys west of the Continental Divide; specimens are 
available from Flathead (Kalispell) and Ravalli Counties, and three were collected from 
Lincoln County in 1995. Eighteen of 1 13 bats captured by Roemer (1994) on the 
Kootenai National Forest were this species; seven were captured in 1995. It has been 
recorded from all but the Fortine and Three Rivers Districts (Appendix 4). While not 
noted during the 1994 survey, this species may have been present at sites where Myotis 
sp. was detected ( most species of Myotis are not easily distinguishable with bat 
detectors). Present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985), but probably 
winters outside of the region. The California myotis is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



13 



Distribution of Myotis ciliolabrum on the Kootenai National Forest 



T 1995 data 

• 1993 & 1994 data 

^ Pre-1 993 data 

Museum specimens 




K+-A 



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^ ^ \ 






i ' v A h r 



'-■A Y 






Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



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Western Small-footed Myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum; formerly M. leibii ciliolabrum) 

Description: This is the smallest (3-7 g) bat in the area. Dorsal pelage is pale yellowish brown 
to golden brown, contrasting with the blackish ears (13-15 mm) and membranes. The 
most notable characteristic other than small size is the strongly-keeled calcar (the spur 
projecting from the ankle which supports the uropatagium). 

Distribution: Ranges over much of western North America from southern Canada to northern 
Mexico. 

Habitat and Habits: Appears to prefer more arid habitats, where it is associated with cliffs, talus, 
clay buttes, and steep riverbanks. Roosts in crevices in buildings, trees, rock faces, and 
clay banks, and may use spaces under and between talus and boulders. Hibernacula 
include caves and abandoned mines in central Montana (Swenson 1970) and Idaho 
(Genter 1986). Tends to become active at dusk and forages low along cliffs and rocky 
slopes rather than over water. Little information is available on reproduction. One of six 
females collected in Carter County in late June to early July carried an embryo (Jones et 
al. 1973), and a lactating female was collected on 18 July (Lampe et al. 1974). Roemer 
(1994) captured a lactating female on 1 September on the Libby District. 

Status: Widespread, but with few records for Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968, Hoffmann et 
al. 1969); appears to be fairly common in Carter and Carbon Counties ( Jones et al. 
1973, Worthington 1991). In western Montana, there are records from Mineral, 
Missoula, and Ravalli Counties (Hoffmann et al. 1969); found at Osoyoos Lake, British 
Columbia and Lethbridge, Alberta (van Zyll de Jong 1985). Seven of 1 13 bats captured 
by Roemer (1994) on the Kootenai National Forest were this species; it has been 
recorded from the Cabinet, Libby, and Rexford Districts (Appendix 4). While not noted 
during the 1994 and 1995 surveys, this species may have been present at sites where 
Myotis sp. was detected (most species of Myotis are not easily distinguishable with bat 
detectors). The western small-footed myotis is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



15 



Distribution of Myotis evotis on the Kootenai National Forest 






V . 




v 1995 data 
• 1 993 & 1994 data 
^ Pre-1 993 data 
>r^ Museum specimens 




Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program November 1 4, 1 996 



Long-eared Myotis (Myotis evotis) 

Description: The ears of this bat are heavily pigmented (black and opaque) and are the longest 
(17-25 mm) of any American myotis; when pressed forward, ears extend >5 mm beyond 
the nose. Fur is long and glossy above, paler below. Posterior border of the uropatagium 
lacks a conspicuous fringe of hair. Weighs 6-8 g. 

Distribution: Ranges over much of the western North America from southern Canada south to 
New Mexico, Arizona, and southern California. 

Habitat and Habits: This species is especially common around rocky habitat in coniferous forest. 
Uses sheds, cabins, caves, and abandoned mines for roosting sites; hibernacula are poorly 
known, but abandoned coal mines have been used in northeastern Montana (Swenson and 
Shanks 1979); the are no overwinter records from British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 
1993). Females apparently form small maternity colonies, though this is poorly 
documented. Pregnant females have been found in late June and early July in British 
Columbia (van Zyll de Jong 1985). A colony was found in an abandoned house in 
Glacier National Park (Lechleitner 1967), and specimens have been obtained in Flathead 
County around Kalispell (Hoffmann et al. 1969); one male was collected on 8 September 
1995 in Lincoln County. Roemer (1994) found lactating females on the Rexford District 
on 29 July and on the Libby District on 25 August; a lactating female was captured on 21 
August 1995 on the Rexford District. In 1994-1995 this species was detected at 28 sites 
in August and September on the Kootenai National Forest (Appendix 3). This species is 
often encountered at late dusk hunting among trees and over water. 

Status: Considered uncommon but widespread in western Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968, 
Hoffmann et al 1 969). Thirteen of 1 1 3 bats captured by Roemer ( 1 994) on the 
Kootenai National Forest were this species; it has been recorded from all Forest Districts 
(Appendix 4). In 1994-1995, this species was recorded from all Districts (Appendix 4). 
Present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). The long-eared myotis is not 
listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



17 



Distribution of Myotis lucifugus on the Kootenai National Forest 



( i 



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1995 data 
1 993 & 1994 data 
Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 







Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



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Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus) 

Description: Dorsal color is dark brown to buffy brown, often with a metallic coppery sheen; 
ears (13-15 mm) are about the same color as the dorsum and rounded. The tragus is 
relatively short and blunt. The uropatagium and wings are naked except along the 
proximal margins. The calcar is not keeled. Weighs 5-9 g. 

Distribution: From central Alaska south and east through most of Canada and the United States 
to central Mexico. 

Habitat and Habits: Widely distributed in a variety of habitats, but usually near water. Day 

roosts include caves, under bark, and in buildings. Hibernacula include caves and mines. 
Two were found hibernating in December near Sidney in eastern Montana (Swenson and 
Shanks 1979) but most probably leave the state during the winter; several hibernacula 
have been found in Alberta (Schowalter et al. 1979), but there are only a few winter 
records of individuals for British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). This species prefers 
to hunt low over water and among trees. Maternity colonies are now most commonly 
found in buildings and are formed in May; young are born in June and early July at this 
latitude. 

Status: This species is one of the most common bats in North America, and is considered 

common throughout Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968) and at lower elevations in 
Glacier National Park to the east (Lechleitner 1967). Fifty-nine of 1 13 bats captured by 
Roemer (1994) were this species; it has been recorded from all Forest Districts 
(Appendix 4). While not noted during the 1994-1995 surveys, this species may have 
been present at sites where Myotis sp. was detected (most species of Myotis are not easily 
distinguishable with bat detectors). Present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 
1985). The little brown myotis is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S5. 



19 



Distribution of Myotis volans on the Kootenai National Forest 




T 1995 data 
• 1 993 & 1994 data 
^ Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 




Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program November 1 4, 1 996 



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Long-legged Myotis (Myotis volans) 

Description: A medium-sized (5-9 g) myotis; fur color varies from reddish brown to nearly 
black. Ears are relatively short (8-16 mm), and blackish brown with rounded tips, just 
reaching nostrils when laid forward. Tragus is short with a small, rounded basal lobe. 
Calcar is keeled. Underwing is densely-furred to a line from elbow to knee. 

Distribution: From northern British Columbia south to central Mexico and east to the central 
Great Plains. 

Habitat and Habits: Inhabits forested regions in both conifers and mixed conifer-hardwoods. 
Roosts in trees, rock crevices, mines, caves, cracks and crevices in stream banks, and in 
buildings. Caves and old mines are used as hibernacula. Swenson and Shanks (1979) 
found hibernating males in a mine in northeastern Montana in December; there are no 
winter records of this species in British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993), but hibernacula 
have been found in Alberta west of Edmonton (Schowalter 1980). It is often found at 
higher elevations up to treeline in summer (Fenton et al. 1983, Hoffmann et al. 1969, 
Pattie and Verbeek 1967). In Carter County, Montana, females with enlarged uteri have 
been collected in late May, females with embryos in late June, and lactating females in 
July and early August (Jones et al. 1973, Lampe et al. 1974). A lactating female was 
caught on the Three Rivers District on 15 July (Roemer 1994), and one was netted on the 
Rexford District on 22 August 1995. This species feeds over meadows and stream 
courses after emerging early in the evening. 

Status: Considered widespread but uncommon in Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968); 

apparently scarce in Glacier National Park (Lechleitner 1967). Nine of 1 13 bats captured 
by Roemer (1994) were this species; it has been recorded from the Cabinet, Fisher River, 
Rexford, and Three Rivers Districts (Appendix 4). While not noted during the 1994 
survey, this species may have been present at sites where Myotis sp. was detected ( most 
species of Myotis are not easily distinguishable with bat detectors). Present in the Idaho 
panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). The long-legged myotis is not listed by any federal 
agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



21 



Distribution of Myotis yumanensis on the Kootenai National Forest 




▼ 1995 data 
• 1 993 & 1994 data 
^ Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 



Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program September 05, 1 996 



Yuma Myotis (Myotis yumanensis) 

Description: Closely resembles M lucifugus, but somewhat smaller with duller, shorter pelage. 
Basal fur on shoulders is lighter colored, and the ears are paler. Ears do not extend 
beyond the tip of the nose when pressed forward. Foot relatively large (9-10 mm); the 
calcar is not keeled. 

Distribution: In western North America from British Columbia to central Mexico, west of the 
100th meridian. 

Habitat and Habits: Appears to be closely associated with water, often in relatively open terrain 
with sparse tree cover. Hibernacula include mines and caves; roosts include buildings, 
hollow trees and under bark, caves, and mines. Often found in mixed colonies with M 
lucifugus (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968). Females form maternity colonies, with young born 
in June in British Columbia (Fenton et al. 1980, van Zyll de Jong 1985). Streams are 
important habitat for this species; it emerges shortly after dusk to forage low over running 
water. 

Status: One of the more common bats in Montana west of the Continental Divide (Hoffmann and 
Pattie 1968, Hoffmann et al. 1969), with specimens from Flathead County (West Glacier) 
south through the Flathead and Bitterroot Valleys. Seven were netted in 1995 on Marten 
Creek in the Cabinet District on 4 September, one of which was collected; these constitute 
the first record of this species on the Kootenai National Forest. While not noted during 
the 1994 survey, this species may have been present at sites where Myotis sp. was 
detected (most species of Myotis are not easily distinguishable with bat detectors). 
Present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). Most individuals probably 
winter outside of the region; there are single winter records from Oregon (Perkins et al. 
1990) and British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). The Yuma myotis is not listed by any 
federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



23 



Distribution of Lasionycteris noctivagans on the Kootenai National Forest 




Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



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Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) 

Description: This bat can be distinguished from all other bats in the Northern Rocky Mountains 
by its distinctive coloration. The dorsal pelage is long, blackish brown, and "frosted" 
with silvery white. Membranes are blackish brown, ears are short (12-17 mm), rounded, 
and naked. The dorsal surface of the uropatagium is furred. Weighs 8-12 g. 

Distribution: Occurs throughout much of the United States and southern Canada north to 
southeastern Alaska and south to northern Mexico. 

Habitat and Habits: Found in a variety of forested habitats, sometimes in open country 

associated with stands of trees; preferably near ponds and streams. Few summer roosts 
have been described, but probable sites are behind bark or in tree cavities. This bat is 
more common in buildings in autumn during migration. Hibernacula include tree 
cavities, rock crevices and buildings, and infrequently in mines or caves. Most 
individuals probably migrate out of the area (Izor 1979), but winter records exist for 
British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). In the Pacific Northwest, summer roosts are 
probably most abundant in old growth forests (Perkins and Cross 1988, Thomas 1988). 
This species is solitary, so it is rarely found in groups with more than 3-4 individuals. 
Mating occurs in autumn, and the young are usually born in June. Volant young and 
lactating females were caught in mid- July in Carter County, Montana (Jones et al. 1973). 
This species emerges early in the evening to forage around street lights, among trees, and 
around standing water in a slow leisurely pattern low over the ground. In 1 994-1 995 this 
species was detected on the Kootenai National Forest at one site in July, 23 sites in 
August, and 23 sites in September (Appendix 3). 

Status: A fairly common summer resident in coniferous forest habitat throughout Montana 

(Hoffmann and Pattie 1968), locally common in Carter County, Montana (Jones et al. 
1973), and probably common in Glacier National Park (Lechleitner 1967). Most 
individuals probably migrate out of the region in autumn. Seven of 1 13 bats captured by 
Roemer (1994) were this species; it has been recorded from all Forest Districts 
(Appendix 4). This species is present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). 
The silver-haired bat is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



25 



Distribution of Eptesicus fuscus on the Kootenai National Forest 



Wl 



<x> 




^ 1995 data 

• 1 993 & 1994 data ) 



Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 



Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



I 



Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) 

Description: This species is easily distinguished from other bats in the Northern Rocky 

Mountains by its large size (only the Hoary Bat is larger); weight range is 16-30 g. 
Pelage is brown, with hair extending only slightly onto the wing and tail membranes. The 
dark-colored ears are of medium size (12-19 mm); the tragus is less than half the length 
of the ear and is blunt. Calcar is usually keeled. Tip of tail extends about 5 mm beyond 
tip of uropatagium. 

Distribution: Widespread across all of the United States and southern half of Canada south to 
northern South America. 

Habitat and Habits: Found in a variety of wooded and semi-open habitats. Colonial, often 

forming colonies in tree cavities, rock crevices and buildings. Hibernacula include caves 
and mines, buildings (attics) and other man-made structures; winter records exist from 
Alberta (Schowalter and Gunson 1979) and British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). 
Maternity colonies have been found in attics, barns in northeastern Montana (Swenson 
and Shanks 1979), and sometimes in tree cavities. Mating occurs in fall and winter. 
Pregnant females have been collected in Carter County, Montana in late June; lactating 
females have been collected in early July, and volant young have been collected in 
mid- July and early August (Jones et al. 1973); most young in Alberta are born in late 
June (Schowalter and Gunson 1979). Emerges at twilight to hunt for an initial period of 
about five hours, after which activity declines; often forages over meadows, around yard 
lights, and along tree-lined streets. In 1994-1995 this species was detected on the 
Kootenai National Forest at one site in July, 27 sites in August, and 30 sites in September 
(Appendix 3). 

Status: Considered less common in Montana than elsewhere in the United States (Hoffmann and 
Pattie 1 968); uncommon in Glacier National Park (Lechleitner 1 967), but the most 
common bat in Carter County, Montana (Jones et al. 1973). Present in the Idaho 
panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). This species was detected on all Districts of the 
Kootenai National Forest in 1994 and 1995 (Appendix 4). The big brown bat is not listed 
by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4. 



27 



Distribution of Lasiurus cinereus on the Kootenai National Forest 




JV 



1995 data 
1 993 & 1994 data N 
Pre-1 993 data ( 

Museum specimens 



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Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 






Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus) 

Description: Can be distinguished from other bats by a combination of its large size (20-35 g) 
and distinctive coloration. Dorsal pelage varies from yellowish brown to mahogany, 
frosted with silver (imparting a "hoary" appearance). Hairs on the neck are longer than 
those on the back, forming a slight "ruff." The wings are furred outward to the level of 
the elbows, and the dorsal surface of the uropatagium is covered with dense fur. There is 
a yellowish white patch on each shoulder and a cream-colored spot near the wrist. Ears 
are short (17-20 mm) and broad, and the calcar is moderately keeled. 

Distribution: Widespread across southern Canada south through the United States to northern 
South America. 

Habitat and Habits: Occurs in many places during migration, but found in wooded habitats 
during the breeding season. This species has not been found wintering in the region 
(Nagorsen et al. 1993) although there is a winter record from western Washington 
(Perkins et al. 1990); arrives in this region in June (Findley and Jones 1964). Day roosts 
(about 3-5 m above ground) are mostly in trees, well-covered with vegetation above and 
open below; apparently both deciduous and coniferous trees are used. Enters caves, 
mines, and houses only rarely. Solitary or in small family groups during summer, 
although larger aggregations may form during migration. Mating may take place before 
migration or on the wintering grounds; females are pregnant by the time they migrate 
north. Lactating females and volant young have been collected in July in the Long Pines 
and Ekalaka Hills of Carter County, Montana (Jones et al. 1973). This species emerges 
later in the evening than other species and is a swift flyer; it flies low, occasionally 
impaling itself on barbed- wire fences. This bat regularly emits a chattering during flight 
that is audible to the human ear. Usually found at lower elevations; summer roosts may 
be most abundant in old growth forests (Perkins and Cross 1988, Thomas 1988). In 
1994-1995 this species was detected at six sites in August and seven in September 
(Appendix 3). 

Status: Hoffmann and Pattie (1968) indicated that there are relatively few records for Montana, 
and the species is hypothetical for Glacier National Park (Lechleitner 1967). It is, 
however, a common summer resident in Carter County (Jones et al. 1973), and 
Worthington (1991) captured several in southern Carbon County. Present in the Idaho 
panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). In 1994-1995, this species was recorded from all 
Districts (Appendix 4). The Hoary Bat is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S4 



29 



Distribution of Plecotus townsendii on the Kootenai National Forest 




v 1995 data 
• 1993 & 1994 data 
^ Pre-1 993 data 
Museum specimens 



Species locations from the Montana Natural Heritage Program May 1 7, 1 996 



Townsend's Big-eared Bat {Corynorhinus [=Plecotus] townsendii) 

Description: Easily distinguished from other bats in the region. A medium-sized (8-12 g) bat 
with very long (30-39 mm) ears and two prominent masses on the lateral surface of the 
snout between the eyes. Wings and tail membranes are hairless, dorsal pelage is 
brownish with individual hairs grayish at the base and cinnamon to brownish at the tip. 

Distribution: In western North America, from southwestern Canada to southern Mexico east to 
western Kansas, Oklahoma, and the Northern Great Plains; also in a narrow band in 
northern Arkansas east to West Virginia. 

Habitat and Habits: Usually found associated with desert shrublands, pinyon-juniper woodlands, 
and dry to wet coniferous forests. A cave dweller for both day roosts and hibernacula; 
Lewis and Clark Caverns, Jefferson County, is a regular hibernaculum (Hoffmann and 
Pattie 1968, Hoffmann et al. 1969). Also frequently found in abandoned mines in central 
and eastern Montana (Hoffmann et al. 1969, Swenson 1972, Swenson and Shanks 1979); 
one individual was found in the Snowstorm Mine (Three Rivers District) on 8 September 
1995. Overwinters regularly in British Columbia (Nagorsen et al. 1993). A colony was 
found in late September in an abandoned farm house in Richland County, Montana 
(Swenson and Shanks 1979). Females form maternity colonies in warmer parts of caves 
and mines. Mating occurs in fall and winter. Disperses from large caves in late spring to 
form maternity colonies in smaller caves and buildings. Emerges well after dark and is a 
slow and agile flyer. In 1994-1995 this species was detected on the Kootenai National 
Forest at two sites in July, ten sites in August, and 24 sites in September (Appendix 3). 

Status: Uncommon in western and central Montana (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968). Found 

throughout northwestern Montana, with specimens from Flathead and Sanders Counties 
(Hoffmann et al. 1969). Present in the Idaho panhandle (Groves and Marks 1985). This 
species was found on all Districts during the 1994-1995 surveys (Appendix 4). 
Townsend's big-eared bat is listed by the U. S. Forest Service (Region 1) as Sensitive. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G4; S2S3 on Species of Special Concern list for Montana. 



31 



Species Potentially Present on the Kootenai National Forest 
Fringed Myotis {Myotis thysanodes) 

Description: A medium-sized (5-8 g) large-eared myotis. Dorsal pelage varies from medium 

brown to pale buff, the individual hairs being grayish-black basally. Ears and membranes 
are blackish brown and often contrast with the pelage color; ears (17-21 mm) extend 3-5 
mm beyond nostrils when pressed forward. Calcar lacks a distinct keel. A fringe of 
conspicuous pale, straw-colored hairs extends posteriorly 1-2 mm beyond the edge of the 
uropatagium. 

Distribution: From southern British Columbia south to southern Mexico and east to western 
North and South Dakota. 

Habitat and Habits: This bat seems to prefer montane and upland forests, but also appears in 
desert scrub and some non-wooded areas. Commonly roosts in buildings, but also uses 
caves and abandoned mines. Hibernacula include old mines and caves. Females form 
maternity colonies of up to several hundred individuals in summer. These bats are often 
observed at dusk foraging along water courses and over standing water. 

Status: Rare in western Montana in summer (Hoffmann and Pattie 1968); specimens exist for 
Ravalli, Missoula, and Lewis and Clark Counties (Hoffmann et al. 1 969). The fringed 
myotis is not listed by any federal agency. 

Natural Heritage Program rank: G5; S3 on Species of Special Concern list for Montana. 



32 



I 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



1) Due to limited time in the field during the 1994 and 1995 surveys, and the in-hand 
examination of few bats, the status and distribution of bats on the Kootenai National Forest 
reported here should not be considered definitive. Although several collections of bats have been 
made in northwestern Montana over the years, most field efforts in the region have been brief 
(less than one month) and not comprehensive; the Kootenai National Forest is notable for the 
absence of data on its bat fauna, although the region is now better-known than many areas in the 
state. Information from the various surveys is beginning to reveal a more complete picture of the 
bat fauna and its habitat associations in the region. Additional summer survey work should be 
done on all Districts, with emphasis on studies designed to determine the importance of forest 
structure and stand treatments to bats in the Northern Rocky Mountains. More survey work 
should be conducted in June and July to determine if bat presence or use of each habitat type is 
constant during summer. Currently, this kind of information is available only for sites in the 
Cascades, although the survey data presented in this report are suggestive and consistent with 
those studies. Use of mist-nets in conjunction with ultra-sound detectors is encouraged. 

2) Kenelty Cave (see Campbell 1978) in the Fisher River District (T26N R29W S4) was not 
surveyed in 1994 or 1995; it should be checked to determine if it is presently used by bats, either 
as a summer roost or hibernaculum. Inspection should be done by experienced bat biologists in 
order to minimize disturbance during summer and to avoid awakening bats and causing mortality 
during hibernation in winter. If used by bats, restricted visitor access to this site may be 
warranted to prevent abandonment. 

3) Additional abandoned mines and buildings on Forest Service land should also be checked for 
hibernating and summer-roosting bats if possible. Underground mines can be checked for 
summer bat activity by stretching mist-nets across adits at dusk and recording captures. Autumn 
inspection of mines may reveal the presence of hibernating individuals. Records should be kept 
of any hibernating or roosting bats found, including locality, species present, number, and date. 

4) Life history information and ecology is poorly known for most bat species in northwestern 
Montana. Any specimens obtained should be preserved. Locality, date, and reproductive status 
should be documented. This is especially true for the western small-footed myotis (Myotis 
ciliolabrum) and fringed myotis {Myotis thysanodes). 

5) If Great Horned Owl or other owl roosts and nest sites are known, pellets could be routinely 
collected and examined for bat remains. A number of nocturnal raptors prey on bats 
opportunistically (e.g., see Mattson 1995), and sometimes systematically. American Kestrels 
will also prey on bats, and their pellets could be examined as well. 



33 



6) Large trees with natural cavities should not be removed. Besides providing nesting and 
roosting sites for birds, some bats will use them for the same purposes (see Gellman and Zielinski 
1996, Mattson et al. 1996, Wunder and Carey 1996). 

7) Because bats are vagile, some species may go undetected unless routine and long-term 
monitoring is conducted. Such a program would be unprecedented in Montana and could 
potentially provide a wealth of information on bat biology currently unavailable for this region. 



34 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Barbour, R. W., and W. H. Davis. 1969. Bats of America. Univ. Press of Kentucky, Lexington, 

Kentucky. 286 pp. 
Barclay, R. M. R. 1986. The echolocation calls of Hoary (Lasiurus cinereus) and Silver-haired 

{Lasionycteris noctivagans) bats as adaptations for long- versus short-range foraging 

strategies and the consequences for prey selection. Can. J. Zool. 64:2700-2705. 
Campbell, L. A., J. G. Hallett, and M. A. O'Connell. 1996. Conservation of bats in managed 

forests: use of roosts by Lasionycteris noctivagans. J. Mamm. 77:976-984. 
Campbell, N. P. 1978. Caves of Montana. Mont. Bur. Mines Geol. Bull. 105. 169 pp. 
Clark, T. W., A. H. Harvey, R. D. Dorn, D. L. Genter, and C. Groves, eds. 1989. Rare, 

sensitive, and threatened species of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Northern 

Rockies Conservation Cooperative, Montana Natural Heritage Program, The Nature 

Conservancy, and Mountain West Environmental Services. 153 pp. 
Clark, T. W., and M. R. Stromberg. 1987. Mammals in Wyoming. Univ. Kan. Mus. Nat. Hist, 

Pub.Ed. Ser.No. 10. 314 pp. 
Cristy, R. E., and S. D. West. 1993. Biology of bats in Douglas-fir forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. 

PNW-GTR-308. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific 

Northwest Research Station. 28 pp. 
Dobkin, D. S., R. D. Gettinger, and M. G. Gerdes. 1995. Springtime movements, roost use, and 

foraging of Townsend's Big-eared Bat (Plecotus townsendii) in central Oregon. Great 

Basin Nat. 55:315-321. 
Erickson, J. L. 1993. Bat activity in managed forests of the southwestern Cascade Range. 

Master's Thesis, Univ. Washington. 66 pp. 
Fenton, M. B., and R. M. R. Barclay. 1980. Myotis lucifugus. Mammalian Species No. 142. 8 

pp. 
Fenton, M. B., and G. P. Bell. 1979. Echolocation and feeding behavior of four species of 

Myotis (Chiroptera). Can. J. Zool. 57:1271-1277. 
Fenton, M. B., and G. P. Bell. 1981. Recognition of species of insectivorous bats by their 

echolocation calls. J. Mamm. 62:233-243. 
Fenton, M. B., H. G. Merriam, and G. L. Holroyd. 1983. Bats of Kootenay, Glacier, and Mount 

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and biology. Can. J. Zool. 61:2503-2508. 
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35 



Garber, C. S. 1991. A survey for Townsend's Big-eared Bat (Plecotus townsendii) and the 

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Hickey, M. B. C, and A. L. Neilson. 1995. Relative activity and occurrence of bats in 

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Keller, B. L. 1985. A simplified key for Idaho bats. Tebiwa 22:57-63. 
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Lechleitner, R. R. 1967. Mammals of Glacier National Park. Glacier Nat. Hist. Assoc, Inc. 

Bull. No. 6. 92 pp. 



36 



I 



Leonard, M. L., and M. B. Fenton. 1983. Habitat use by Spotted Bats {Euderma maculatum, 
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Shryer, J., and D. Flath. 1980. First record of the Pallid Bat {Antrozous pallidus) from Montana. 
I Great Basin Nat. 40: 1 1 5. 



37 



I 



Shump, K. A., Jr., and A. U. Shump. 1982. Lasiurus cinereus. Mammalian Species No. 185. 5 

pp. 
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the temperatures at which bats hibernate. Can. J. Zool. 74:761-765. 



38 



Wilson, D. E., F. R. Cole, J. D. Nichols, R. Rudran, and M. S. Foster. 1996. Measuring and 

monitoring biological diversity: standard methods for mammals. Smithsonian Institution 

Press, Washington, D.C. 409 pp. 
Woodsworth, G. C, G. P. Bell, and M. B. Fenton. 1981. Observations of the echolocation, 

feeding behavior, and habitat use of Euderma maculatum (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) 

in south central British Columbia. Can. J. Zool. 59:1099-1 102. 
Worthington, D. J. 1991. Abundance and distribution of bats in the Pryor Mountains of south 

central Montana and north eastern Wyoming. Montana Natural Heritage Program. 

Helena, MT. 23 pp. 
Wunder, L., and A. B. Carey. 1996. Use of the forest canopy by bats. Northwest Sci. 70 

(special issue):79-85. 



39 



APPENDIX 1 
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APPENDIX 2 

SITES OF ANABAT SURVEYS FOR BATS IN 1994-1995 

KOOTENAI NATIONAL FOREST, MONTANA 



41 



Appendix 2. Sites of ANABAT surveys for bats on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana in 
1994-1995. 



District 


Location 


Date 


Cabinet 


T22NR31WS3NE 


23 Sept 95 




T22N R31W S3NW (2 sites) 


23 Sept 95 




T22NR31WS4NE(2sites) 


23 Sept 95 




T24N R30W S6SW 


03 Sept 95 




T24N R30W S7NE 


03 Sept 95 




T24N R30W S7NW 


03 Sept 95 




T24NR31WS12SE 


03 Sept 95 




T24NR31WS14SE 


03 Sept 95 




T24NR31WS14SW 


03 Sept 95 




T25N R32W S28SW 


04 Sept 95 




T25N R32W S29SE 


04 Sept 95 




T25N R33W S25SE 


04 Sept 95 




T25N R33W S26SE 


04 Sept 95 




T25N R33W S26SW 


04 Sept 95 




T25NR33WS31NW 


04 Sept 95 




T26N R32W S2SE 


05 Sept 95 




T26NR32WS10NE 


05 Sept 95 




T26N R32W S10NW (2 sites) 


05 Sept 95 




T26NR32WS10SE 


05 Sept 95 




T26N R33W S3NW (2 sites) 


19 Sept 94 




T26N R33W S3SW 


19 Sept 94 




T26N R33W S9NW 


14 Aug 94 




T27N R32W S3SE 


18 Sept 94 




T27N R32W S4NE (3 sites) 


18 Sept 94 




T27N R32W S5SW 


18 Sept 94 




T27N R33W S32NW 


14 Aug 94 




T27N R33W S34SW (2 sites) 


19 Sept 94 


Fisher River 


T25N R29W S24NE 


22 Aug 94 




T26N R28W S10SE (2 sites) 


18 Sept 95 




T26N R28W S14NW (2 sites) 


18 Sept 95 




T26NR28WS14SE 


18 Sept 95 




T28N R27.5W S13SW (2 sites) 


17 Sept 95 




T28N R28W S3NW (2 sites) 


17 Sept 95 




T28NR28WS11SW 


17 Sept 95 



42 



Appendix 2 (cont). Sites of ANABAT surveys for bats on the Kootenai National Forest, 
Montana in 1994-1995. 



District 



Location 



Date 



Fisher River (cont.) 



Fortine 



T29N R26W S3 1NW (2 sites) 


15 Aug 94 


T30N R28W S3NE 


14 Sept 95 


T30N R28W S3NW (2 sites) 


14 Sept 95 


T31NR26WS7SE 


16 Sept 95 


T31NR26WS17NW 


16 Sept 95 


T31NR27WS1NE 


16 Sept 95 


T31NR29WS25NE 


14 Sept 95 


T31NR29WS25SE 


14 Sept 95 


T32N R26W S20SW 


16 Sept 95 


T32N R26W S29SW 


16 Sept 95 


T32N R27W S9NE 


15 Sept 95 


T32N R27W S9NW 


15 Sept 95 


T32N R27W S9SW 


15 Sept 95 


T32NR27WS17SW 


15 Sept 95 


T32N R28W S24NE 


15 Sept 95 


T32NR26WS11NE 


07 Sept 94 


T32NR26WS11NE 


19, 20 Aug 95 


T32NR26WS11SE 


07 Sept 94 


T32NR26WS11SE 


19, 20 Aug 95 


T32N R26W S12SW (2 sites) 


07 Sept 94 


T32N R26W S12SW (2 sites) 


19, 20 Aug 95 


T32NR26WS13NW 


07 Sept 94 


T32NR26WS13NW 


19, 20 Aug 95 


T33N R24W S7NE 


22 Sept 95 


T33NR24WS17NE 


22 Sept 95 


T33NR24WS17NW 


22 Sept 95 


T33NR24WS17SE 


22 Sept 95 


T33NR24WS18NW 


22 Sept 95 


T33NR26WS1NE 


06 Sept 94 


T34N R25W S5NW 


30 July 94 


T34N R25W S7NW 


30 July 94 


T34N R25W S24SW 


06 Sept 94 


T34N R25W S25NE 


06 Sept 94 


T35N R25W S6SW 


21 Sept 95 



43 



Appendix 2 (cont). Sites of ANABAT surveys for bats on the Kootenai National Forest, 
Montana in 1994-1995. 



District 


Location 


Date 


Fortine (cont.) 


T35N R25W S7NW 


21 Sept 95 




T35N R25W S7SE (2 sites) 


21 Sept 95 




T35NR25WS14SE 


20 Sept 95 




T35NR25WS15SE 


20 Sept 95 




T35NR25WS15SW 


20 Sept 95 




T35N R25W S20SE 


20 Sept 95 




T35N R25W S21NW 


20 Sept 95 




T36N R25W S28 


21 Sept 95 




T37N R25W S29SE (2 sites) 


31 July 94 


Libby 


T26N R30W S2NE 


16 Sept 94 




T26N R30W S3SE (2 sites) 


16 Sept 94 




T27N R29W S31NE (2 sites) 


16 Sept 94 




T27NR31WS13NE(3sites) 


1 1 Aug 94 




T29NR31WS5NW 


26 Aug 95 




T29NR31WS5SE 


26 Aug 95 




T29NR31WS5SW 


26 Aug 95 




T29NR31WS7NW 


26 Aug 95 


& 


T29NR31WS26NW 


27 Aug 95 


%! 


T29NR31WS33NE 


27 Aug 95 




T29NR31WS33SE 


27 Aug 95 




T29N R3 1 W S34NW (2 sites) 


27 Aug 95 




T29N R32W S12NE 


26 Aug 95 




T3 IN R3 1 W S22NW (2 sites) 


08 Sept 94 




T32NR31WS23SW 


08 Sept 94 




T32N R31W S35NE (2 sites) 


08 Sept 94 




T32N R32W S2SW 


13 Sept 95 




T32N R32W S14NW (2 sites) 


13 Sept 95 




T32NR32WS14SW 


13 Sept 95 




T32N R32W S23SW 


13 Sept 95 


Rexford 


T34N R27W S3SE 


15, 16 July 95 




T34N R27W S3SW 


15, 16 July 95 




T34NR27WS10SW 


15, 16 July 95 




T34NR27WS16SE 


15, 16 July 95 



44 



Appendix 2 (cont). Sites of ANABAT surveys for bats on the Kootenai National Forest, 
Montana in 1994-1995. 



1 

District 


Location 


Date 


[ 

Rexford (cont.) 


T34N R27W S29SE 


15, 16 July 95 


[ 


T35N R28W S28SE (2 sites) 


19 Sept 95 


I 


T35N R28W S29SE 


19 Sept 95 


■ 


T35N R28W S34NW 


19 Sept 95 


j 


T35N R29W S25SE 


19 Sept 95 


i 


T35N R30W S26SW 


21 Aug 95 




T35N R30W S27SE (2 sites) 


21 Aug 95 




T35N R30W S33NE 


21 Aug 95 




T35N R30W S33SE 


21 Aug 95 




T36NR28WS12NE 


17 Aug 94 




T36NR28WS19NE 


22 Aug 95 




T36NR28WS19NW 


22 Aug 95 


I 


T36N R28W S20SW 


22 Aug 95 


1 


T36N R28W S24NE 


22 Aug 95 




T36N R28W S24NW 


22 Aug 95 


Three Rivers 


T28N R33W S9NW 


21 Aug 94 




T28N R34W S12NE (3sites) 


21 Aug 94 




T30N R34W S28NW 


06 Sept 95 




T30N R34W S29NW (2 sites) 


06 Sept 95 




T30N R34W S30SE 


06 Sept 95 




T30N R34W S30SW 


06 Sept 95 




T30N R35W S25SE 


06 Sept 95 




T31NR34WS19SE 


08 Sept 95 




T31NR34WS20NW 


08 Sept 95 




T31NR34WS20SW(3sites) 


08 Sept 95 




T31NR34WS21NW 


08 Sept 95 




T32NR34WS1NW 


28 Aug 95 




T32NR34WS11NE 


28 Aug 95 




T32NR34WS12NE 


28 Aug 95 




T32NR34WS12NW 


28 Aug 95 




T33N R34W S32SE 


28 Aug 95 




T34NR31WS6NE 


25 Aug 95 




T34N R31W S8NW (2 sites) 


25 Aug 95 




T34N R33W S33SE (3 sites) 


17 Sept 94 



45 



Appendix 2 (cont). Sites of ANABAT surveys for bats on the Kootenai National Forest, 
Montana in 1994-1995. 



District 


Location 


Date 


Three Rivers (cont.) 


T34N R33W S34SW 


17 Sept 94 




T35NR31WS30NE 


25 Aug 95 




T35N R32W S25SE 


25 Aug 95 




T35N R33W S1NW (3 sites) 


19, 20 Aug 94 




T36N R32W S30NE 


20 Aug 94 




T36NR33WS11NE 


20 Aug 94 




T37N R30W S20SW (2 sites) 


23 Aug 95 




T37N R30W S28NW 


23 Aug 95 




T37N R30W S29NE (2 sites) 


23 Aug 95 




T37N R32W S27SW 


24 Aug 95 




T37N R32W S28SE 


24 Aug 95 




T37N R32W S35NE 


24 Aug 95 




T37NR32WS35NW 


24 Aug 95 




T37NR32WR35SE 


24 Aug 95 



46 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 



APPENDIX 3 

BAT SPECIES DETECTED DURING 1994-1995 ANABAT SURVEYS 

KOOTENAI NATIONAL FOREST, MONTANA 



47 



Appendix 3. Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys on the 
Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Myotis sp. T22N R3 1 W S3NW (Cabinet) 23 Sept 95 

T22N R3 1 W S4NE (Cabinet) 23 Sept 95 

T24N R30W S7NE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24N R30W S7NW (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24N R3 1 W S 1 2SE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24N R3 1 W S 1 4SE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T25N R32W S28SW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T25N R32W S29SE (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T25N R33 W S3 1NW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T26N R32W S 1 ONE (Cabinet) 05 Sept 95 

T26N R32W S 1 0SE (Cabinet) 05 Sept 95 

T26N R33 W S3NW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T26N R33 W S3SW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T26N R33 W S9NW (Cabinet) 1 4 Aug 94 

T27N R32 W S3 SE (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R32W S4NE (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R32W S5SW (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R33 W S32NW (Cabinet) 1 4 Aug 94 

T27N R33 W S34SW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T25N R28 W S 1 OSE (Fisher River) 1 8 Sept 95 

T25N R29W S24NE (Fisher River) 22 Aug 94 

T26N R28W S 14NW (Fisher River) 1 8 Sept 95 

T28N R27.5W S13SW (Fisher River) 17 Sept 95 

T28N R28 W S3NW (Fisher River) 1 7 Sept 95 

T28N R28 W S 1 1 S W (Fisher River) 1 7 Sept 95 

T29N R26W S3 1NW (Fisher River) 1 5 Aug 94 

T30N R28 W S3NE (Fisher River) 1 4 Sept 95 

T30N R28W S3NW (Fisher River) 14 Sept 95 

T3 IN R26W S7SE (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T3 IN R26W S 1 7NW (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T3 IN R27W S 1NE (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T3 IN R29W S25SE (Fisher River) 14 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S20S W (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S29SW (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T32N R27W S9NE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 



48 



I 



I 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Myotis sp. (cont.) T32N R27W S9NW (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R28 W S24NE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S 1 1NE (Fortine) 1 9, 20 Aug 95 

T32N R26W S 1 1 SE (Fortine) 1 9, 20 Aug 95 

T32N R26W S 1 2SW (Fortine) 07 Sept 94 

T32N R26 W S 1 2S W (Fortine) 2 1 Aug 95 

T32N R26W S 1 3NW (Fortine) 07 Sept 94 

T32N R26W S 1 3NW (Fortine) 20 Aug 95 

T33N R24W S7NE (Fortine) 22 Sept 95 

T33N R24W S 1 7NE (Fortine) 22 Sept 95 

T33N R24W S 1 7NW (Fortine) 22 Sept 95 

T33N R24W S 1 8NW (Fortine) 22 Sept 95 

T33N R26W S 1NE (Fortine) 06 Sept 94 

T34NR25WS7NW (Fortine) 30 July 94 

T34N R25W S25NE (Fortine) 06 Sept 94 

T34N R25 W S6SW (Fortine) 2 1 Sept 95 

T34N R25 W S7NW (Fortine) 2 1 Sept 95 

T35N R25W S15SE (Fortine) 20 Sept 95 

T35NR25WS20SE (Fortine) 20 Sept 95 

T35N R25W S21NW (Fortine) 20 Sept 95 

T36N R25W S28 (Fortine) 2 1 Sept 95 

T37N R25 W S29SE (Fortine) 3 1 July 94 

T27N R29W S3 1NE (Libby) 1 6 Sept 94 

T27N R3 1 W S 1 3NE (Libby) 1 1 Aug 94 

T29N R3 1 W S5NW (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T29N R3 1 W S5SE (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T29N R3 1 W S5S W (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T29N R3 1 W S33NE (Libby) 27 Aug 95 

T29N R3 1 W S34NW (Libby) 27 Aug 95 

T29N R32 W S 1 2NE (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T3 IN R3 1 W S22NW (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T3 IN R3 1 W S23SW (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T32N R3 1 W S3 5NE (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T32N R32W S 14NW (Libby) 1 3 Sept 95 

T32N R32W S14SW (Libby) 13 Sept 95 



49 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Myotis sp. (cont.) T32N R32W S23 SW (Libby) 1 3 Sept 95 

T34N R27W S3 SE (Rexford) 1 6 July 95 

T34N R27W S 1 6SE (Rexford) 15,16 July 95 

T35N R28W S28SE (Rexford) 1 9 Sept 95 

T35N R28W S29SE (Rexford) 1 9 Sept 95 

T35N R28W S34NW (Rexford) 1 9 Sept 95 

T35N R30W S26SW (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T35N R30W S27SE (Rexford) 21 Aug 95 

T35N R28W S33NE (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T3 5N R28 W S33 SE (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S12NE (Rexford) 17 Aug 94 

T36N R28 W S 1 9NE (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S 1 9NW (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S20SW (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T36N R29W S24NE (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T28N R34W S 12NE (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 

T30N R34W S28NW (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T30N R34W S29NW (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T30N R34W S30SE (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T30N R34W S30SW (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T3 IN R34W S20NW (Three Rivers) 08 Sept 95 

T3 IN R34W S20SW (Three Rivers) 08 Sept 95 

T32N R34W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T32N R34W S 1 1NE (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T32N R34W S 1 2NE (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T32N R34W S12NW (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T33N R34W S32SE (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T34N R3 1 W S6NE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T34N R3 1 W S8NW (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T34N R33W S33SE (Three Rivers) 1 7 Sept 94 

T3 5N R3 1 W S30NE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T35N R32W S25SE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T35N R33 W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 1 9, 20 Aug 94 

T36N R32W S30NE (Three Rivers) 20 Aug 94 

T37N R30W S20SW (Three Rivers) 23 Aug 95 



50 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Myotis sp. (cont.) T3 7N R30W S28NW (Three Rivers) 23 Aug 95 

T37N R30W S29NE (Three Rivers) 23 Aug 95 

T37N R32W S35NE (Three Rivers) 24 Aug 95 

T37N R32W S35SE (Three Rivers) 24 Aug 95 

M. evotis T24N R30W S27NE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24NR31WS14SE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T25N R32W S28SW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T25N R33 W S3 1NW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T26N R32W S 10SE (Cabinet) 05 Sept 95 

T26N R33 W S3NW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T26N R33 W S3SW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T26N R33 W S9NW (Cabinet) 1 4 Aug 94 

T27N R32W S3SE (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R32W S4NE (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R33W S32NW (Cabinet) 14 Aug 94 

T27N R33 W S34SW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T28N R28W S3NW (Fisher River) 1 7 Sept 95 

T29N R26W S3 1NW (Fisher River) 1 5 Aug 94 

T30N R28 W S3NE (Fisher River) 1 4 Sept 95 

T35N R25W S6SW (Fortine) 21 Sept 95 

T27N R29W S3 1NE (Libby) 1 6 Sept 94 

T27N R3 1 W S 1 3NE (Libby) 1 1 Aug 94 

T29N R3 1 W S5SE (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T32N R3 1 W S35NE (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T36N R28 W S 1 2NE (Rexford) 1 7 Aug 94 

T28N R33 W S9NW (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 

T28N R34W S 1 2NE (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 

T30N R34W S30SW (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T3 IN R34W S20SW (Three Rivers) 08 Sept 95 

T32N R34W S 1 1NE (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T34N R33 W S33SE (Three Rivers) 1 7 Sept 94 

T35N R33 W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 20 Aug 94 



51 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Lasionycteris noctivagans T22N R3 1 W S3NW (Cabinet) 23 Sept 95 

T25N R33 W S3 1NW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T26N R33 W S3NW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T27N R33W S32NW (Cabinet) 14 Aug 94 

T25N R29W S24NE (Fisher River) 22 Aug 94 

T26N R28W S14NW (Fisher River) 18 Sept 95 

T28N R27.5W S13SW (Fisher River) 17 Sept 95 

T29N R26W S3 1NW (Fisher River) 1 5 Aug 94 

T30N R28 W S3NE (Fisher River) 1 4 Sept 95 

T30N R28 W S3NW (Fisher River) 1 4 Sept 95 

T3 IN R29W S25SE (Fisher River) 1 4 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S29S W (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T32N R27W S9SE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R28W S24NE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S 1 1 SE (Fortine) 07 Sept 94 

T32N R26W S 1 1 SE (Fortine) 20 Aug 95 

T32N R26W S 1 3NW (Fortine) 07 Sept 94 

T32N R26W S 1 3NW (Fortine) 20 Aug 95 

T33N R24W S 1 7NW (Fortine) 22 Sept 95 

T33N R26W S 1NE (Fortine) 06 Sept 94 

T34N R25W S7NW (Fortine) 30 July 94 

T34N R25W S25 NE (Fortine) 06 Sept 94 

T27N R29W S3 1NE (Libby) 1 6 Sept 94 

T27N R3 1 W S 1 3NE (Libby) 1 1 Aug 94 

T29N R3 1 W S5NW (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T29N R3 1 W S5SW (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T32N R3 1 W S35NE (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T32N R32W S 1 4SW (Libby) 1 3 Sept 95 

T3 5N R28 W S28SE (Rexford) 1 9 Sept 95 

T3 5N R30W S27SE (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T35N R30W S33SE (Rexford) 21 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S 1 9NE (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S 1 9NW (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T36N R29W S24NE (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T28N R33 W S9NW (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 



52 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Lasionycteris noctivagans (cont.) 

T28N R34W S 1 2NE (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 

T30N R34W S30SE (Three Rivers) 06 Sept 95 

T3 IN R34W S20SW (Three Rivers) 08 Sept 95 

T32N R34W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 28 Aug 95 

T34N R3 1 W S6NE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T34N R33W S33SE (Three Rivers) 17 Sept 94 

T35N R3 1 W S30NE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T35N R33 W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 1 9, 20 Aug 94 

T36N R32W S30NE (Three Rivers) 20 Aug 94 

T37NR30WS20SW (Three Rivers) 23 Aug 95 

T37N R30W S29NE (Three Rivers) 23 Aug 95 

T37N R32W S35SE (Three Rivers) 24 Aug 95 

Eptesicusfuscus T22N R3 1 W S3NW (Cabinet) 23 Sept 95 

T22N R3 1 W S4NE (Cabinet) 23 Sept 95 

T24N R30W S7NW (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24N R30W S7NE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T24N R3 1 W S 1 4SE (Cabinet) 03 Sept 95 

T25N R33 W S3 1NW (Cabinet) 04 Sept 95 

T26N R33 W S3NW (Cabinet) 1 9 Sept 94 

T26N R33W S9NW (Cabinet) 14 Aug 94 

T27N R32W S3SE (Cabinet) 1 8 Sept 94 

T27N R32 W S32NW (Cabinet) 1 4 Aug 94 

T27N R28 W S 1 0SE (Fisher River) 1 8 Sept 95 

T26N R28 W S 1 4NW (Fisher River) 1 8 Sept 95 

T29N R26W S3 1NW (Fisher River) 1 5 Aug 94 

T30N R28W S3NE (Fisher River) 14 Sept 95 

T3 IN R26W S 1 7N W (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T3 IN R27W S 1NE (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T3 IN R29W S25SE (Fisher River) 14 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S29S W (Fisher River) 1 6 Sept 95 

T32N R27W S9NE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R28W S24NE (Fisher River) 1 5 Sept 95 

T32N R26W S 1 3NW (Fortine) 20 Aug 95 



53 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species 



Location 



Eptesicus fuscus (cont.) 



T33N R24W 
T33N R24W 
T33N R26W 
T34N R25W 
T36N R25W 
T27N R29W 
T27NR31W 
T29NR31W 
T29NR31W 
T29NR31W 
T29NR31W 
T29N R32W 
T31NR31W 
T32NR31W 
T32N R32W 
T32N R32W 
T35N R30W 
T35N R30W 
T35N R30W 
T36N R28W 
T36N R28W 
T36N R28W 
T36N R28W 
T28N R34W 
T30N R34W 
T30N R34W 
T31NR34W 
T34NR31W 
T34N R33W 
T35N R32W 
T35N R33W 
T36N R32W 
T37N R30W 
T37N R30W 
T37N R30W 



S17NE(Fortine) 
S17NW(Fortine) 
SlNE(Fortine) 
S7NW (Fortine) 
S28 (Fortine) 
S31NE(Libby) 
S13NE(Libby) 
S5NW (Libby) 
S5SE (Libby) 
S5SE (Libby) 
S33NE (Libby) 
S12NE (Libby) 
S22NW (Libby) 
S35NE (Libby) 
S14NW (Libby) 
S14SW (Libby) 
S27SE (Rexford) 
S33NE (Rexford) 
S33SE (Rexford) 
S12NE (Rexford) 
S19NE (Rexford) 
S19NW (Rexford) 
S20SW (Rexford) 
S12NE (Three Rivers) 
S28NW (Three Rivers) 
S30SE (Three Rivers) 
S20SW (Three Rivers) 
S6NE (Three Rivers) 
S33SE (Three Rivers) 
S25SE (Three Rivers) 
S1NW (Three Rivers) 
S30NE (Three Rivers) 
S20SW (Three Rivers) 
S28NW (Three Rivers) 
S29NE (Three Rivers) 



Date 



22 Sept 95 
22 Sept 95 
06 Sept 94 
30 July 94 
21 Sept 95 

16 Sept 94 
1 1 Aug 94 
26 Aug 95 
26 Aug 95 

26 Aug 95 

27 Aug 95 
26 Aug 95 
08 Sept 94 
08 Sept 94 
13 Sept 95 
13 Sept 95 
21 Aug 95 
21 Aug 95 

21 Aug 95 

17 Aug 94 

22 Aug 95 
22 Aug 95 

22 Aug 95 
21 Aug 94 
06 Sept 95 
06 Sept 95 
08 Sept 95 
25 Aug 95 
17 Sept 94 
25 Aug 95 
19, 20 Aug 94 
20 Aug 94 

23 Aug 95 
23 Aug 95 
23 Aug 95 



54 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species 
I 


Location 


Date 


1 

Eptesicus fuscus (cont.) 


T37N R32W S35NE (Three Rivers) 


24 Aug 95 




T37N R32W S35SE (Three Rivers) 


24 Aug 95 


Lasiurus cinereus 


T25N R32W S28SW (Cabinet) 


04 Sept 95 




T32N R27W S9NE (Fisher River) 


15 Sept 95 




T32N R26W S12SW (Fortine) 


07 Sept 94 




T32N R26W S13NW (Fortine) 


07 Sept 94 




T33N R26W SINE (Fortine) 


06 Sept 94 




T29N R3 1 W S34NW (Libby) 


27 Aug 95 




T32N R32W S14SW (Libby) 


13 Sept 95 




T36N R28W S12NE (Rexford) 


17 Aug 94 




T28N R33W S9NW (Three Rivers) 


21 Aug 94 




T28N R34W S12NE (Three Rivers) 


21 Aug 94 




T31N R34W S20SW (Three Rivers) 


08 Sept 95 




T35N R33W S1NW (Three Rivers) 


19, 20 Aug 94 




T36N R32W S30NE (Three Rivers) 


20 Aug 94 


Corynorhinus townsendii 


T24N R30W S7NW (Cabinet) 


03 Sept 95 




T24N R31W S14SE (Cabinet) 


03 Sept 95 




T26N R33W S3NW (Cabinet) 


19 Sept 94 




T26N R33W S3SW (Cabinet) 


19 Sept 94 




T27N R32W S3SE (Cabinet) 


18 Sept 94 




T27N R32W S4NE (Cabinet) 


18 Sept 94 




T27N R33W S32NW (Cabinet) 


14 Aug 94 




T27N R33W S34SW (Cabinet) 


19 Sept 94 




T28N R28W S3NW (Fisher River) 


17 Sept 95 




T30N R28W S3NE (Fisher River) 


14 Sept 95 




T3 IN R26W S7SE (Fisher River) 


16 Sept 95 




T31N R26W S17NW (Fisher River) 


16 Sept 95 




T31N R29W S25SE (Fisher River) 


14 Sept 95 




T32N R28W S24NE (Fisher River) 


15 Sept 95 




T32N R27W S9NE (Fisher River) 


15 Sept 95 




T32N R26W S12SW (Fortine) 


07 Sept 94 




T32N R26W S13NW (Fortine) 


07 Sept 94 




T33N R26W SINE (Fortine) 


06 Sept 94 



55 



Appendix 3 (cont). Locations of bat species detected during the 1994-1995 ANABAT surveys 
on the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 



Species Location Date 



Corynorhinus townsendii (cont.) 

T34N R25W S7NW (Fortine) 30 July 94 

T34N R25W S25NE (Fortine) 06 Sept 94 

T27N R29W S3 1NE (Libby) 1 6 Sept 94 

T27N R31W S13NE (Libby) 1 1 Aug 94 

T29N R32 W S 1 2NE (Libby) 26 Aug 95 

T32N R3 1 W S23SW (Libby) 08 Sept 94 

T32N R32W S 14NW (Libby) 1 3 Sept 95 

T32N R32W S14SW (Libby) 13 Sept 95 

T34N R27W S3 SE (Rexford) 1 6 July 95 

T35N R30W S27SE (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T35N R30W S33NE (Rexford) 2 1 Aug 95 

T36N R28W S 1 9NE (Rexford) 22 Aug 95 

T28N R34W S 1 2NE (Three Rivers) 2 1 Aug 94 

T3 IN R34W S20S W (Three Rivers) 08 Sept 95 

T34N R3 1 W S6NE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T34N R33 W S33 SE (Three Rivers) 1 7 Sept 94 

T35N R32W S25SE (Three Rivers) 25 Aug 95 

T35N R33W S 1NW (Three Rivers) 1 9 Aug 94 



56 



I 
I 
I 



APPENDIX 4 

KNOWN DISTRIBUTION OF BAT SPECIES 

ON THE KOOTENAI NATIONAL FOREST, MONTANA 



57 



Appendix 4. Bat species presence on Districts of the Kootenai National Forest, Montana. 





Cabinet 


Fisher R. 


Fortine 


Libby 


Rexford 


Three R. 


Myotis sp. 


2,3 a 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


M. californicus 


1 


1,3 




1 


1,3 




M. ciliolabrum 


1 






1 


1 




M. evotis 


1,2,3 


1,2,3 


1,3 


1,2,3 


1,2,3 


1,2,3 


M. lucifugus 


1 


1,2 


1 


1,2 


1 


1 


M. volans 


1 


1 






1,3 


1 


M. yumanensis 


3 












Lasionycteris noctivagans 


1,2,3 


2,3 


1,2,3 


1,2,3 


1,3 


2,3 


Eptesicus fuscus 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


2,3 


Lasiurus cinereus 


3 


3 


2 


3 


2 


2,3 


Corynorhinus townsendii 


2,3 


3 


2 


2,3 


3 


2,3 



a Sources: Roemer 1994 (1); 1994 field season or Hendricks et al. 1995 (2); 1995 field season 
(3). 



58 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTIS SPP. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 6/30/1994 No Taped Call 
Old Historic Ant Flat Ranger Station (FS Rd. 36) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 7/31/1994 No Taped Call 
Big Therriault Lake (north end near campground) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 6/1994 No Taped Call 
Blue Lake, ca. 1 mile south of Stryker 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1994 No Taped Call 
Fisher Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake (NW shoreline by campground) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake outlet stream near campground 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/15/1994 No Taped Call 
S end of Island Lake, Plum Cr. Property 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/15/1994 No Taped Call 
Marsh on SW corner of Island Lake (Plum Cr. prop.) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 8/1994 No Taped Call 
Libby Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Creek-marsh draining Howard Lake 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No Taped Call 
North of Stillwater River Site #2 



59 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
7 mi. up Pete Cr. Rd. @ confluence of FS Rd 6134 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
F.S.Rd. #315 Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 7/1994 No Taped Call 
F.S.Rd. #315 Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Along Lake Koocanusa-Tobacco River 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Parking lot & down Ross Creek Cedars Road 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Ross Creek Cedars below picnic area over Ross Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
Jim's "Bog-Lemming Bog" off Sunday Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1994 No Taped Call 
Sylvan Lake Campgrounds 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #2 



60 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Draw above Whitetail Campground N. of HWY; Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Lower Adit of Big 8 Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Upper Adit of Big 8 Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull Lake - north end 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull Lake - south end 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Crescent Mine Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Double Mac Mine 



61 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Luken-Hazel Mine II Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Herbert Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Cherry Creek Mill Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
Midas Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
FSRD231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Stimson Lumber Company treatment ponds (Libby) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Mitchell Creek Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Mountain View Park 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermiculite Mtn./Rainy Cr.-lower pond near gate 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Rest area 1 mile east of Troy 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #1 



62 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 

Wolf Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 

Wolf Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #4 



63 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTIS SPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #5 



64 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Grave Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Grave Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Grave Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Deep Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Deep Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Deep Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #1 



65 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #6 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/27/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Hoodoo #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/27/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Hoodoo #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #4 



66 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 

MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 1/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 1/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #6 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/24/1995 No Taped Call 
French Creek #1 



67 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/24/1995 No Taped Call 
French Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #4 



68 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 5/1995 No Taped Call 
Marten Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Marten Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Sutton Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Sutton Creek #2 



69 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Sutton Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Sutton Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 7/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Pinkham Creek Rd. #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 7/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Pinkham Creek Rd. #4 

Lincoln <. 5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #3 



70 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 

MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #3 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #4 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir (HWY 200) 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir @ intersection of Bull R. 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #2 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #4 



71 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



MYOTISSPP. (continued) 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #5 

LITTLE BROWN MYOTIS 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Ross Creek Cedars 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Bull Lake 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Bear Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Timberlane Campground 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Upper Fortine Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Lower Fortine Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Sunday Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Sylvan Lake Campground 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Weigle Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Big Creek 



72 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LITTLE BROWN MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Sutton Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil 6/12/1949 No Museum Specimen 
3 mi. above mouth of Fisher River 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil II 1/1967 No Museum Specimen 
Pumphouse near Libby 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1992 No Specimen Reported 
Sunday Creek 

Sanders < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Devils Gap 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Lower Beaver Creek 

YUMA MYOTIS 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/4/1995 No Museum Specimen 
Marten Creek 

LONG-EARED MYOTIS 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1994 No Taped Call 
Fisher Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake outlet stream near campground 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/15/1994 No Taped Call 
Marsh on SW corner of Island Lake (Plum Cr. prop.) 



73 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LONG-EARED MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Creek-marsh draining Howard Lake 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Along Lake Koocanusa-Tobacco River 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Parking lot & down Ross Creek Cedars Road 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Ross Creek Cedars below picnic area over Ross Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Valley @ Ross Cr. turnoff & HWY 56 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Draw above Whitetail Campground N. of HWY; Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #3 

Lincoln <.5mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Ross Creek Cedars 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Bear Creek 

Lincoln <.5mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Timberlane Campground 



74 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LONG-EARED MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Lower Fortine Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Sylvan Lake Campground 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Weigle Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Camp 32 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Double Mac Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
FSRd.231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Stimson Lumber Company treatment ponds (Libby) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Mountain View Park 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Grave Creek #5 



75 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LONG-EARED MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #5 

Lincoln <.5mile. 9/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Marten Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Museum Specimen 
Callahan Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil 8/21/1995 No Specimen Reported 
Big Creek, Rexford Ranger District 



76 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LONG-EARED MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Specimen Reported 
Double Mac Mine, Granite Creek, Libby Rang. Dist. 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #3 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir (HWY 200) 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir @ intersection of Bull R. 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #5 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Marten Creek 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Vermillion River 

LONG-LEGGED MYOTIS 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Ross Creek Cedars 



77 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



LONG-LEGGED MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Weigle Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Big Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil 8/22/1995 No Specimen Reported 
Sullivan Creek, Rexford Ranger District 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Young Creek 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Rock Creek 

CALIFORNIA MYOTIS 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Bear Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Five Mile Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Sylvan Lake Campground 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Bristow Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Big Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Camp 32 



78 



I 
I 
I 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



CALIFORNIA MYOTIS (continued) 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Young Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Museum Specimen 
Five-mile Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Museum Specimen 
Sutton Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Museum Specimen 
Sutton Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil 8/28/1995 No Specimen Reported 
Star Creek, Three Rivers Ranger District 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Marten Creek 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Upper Beaver Creek 

WESTERN SMALL-FOOTED MYOTIS 

Lincoln < .5 mile. / /1993 No Observation 
Timberlane Campground 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Sutton Creek 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /l 993 No Observation 

Rock Creek 



79 



Natural Heritage Program 09/ 1 8/ 1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 6/30/1994 No Taped Call 
Old Historic Ant Flat Ranger Station (FS Rd. 36) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 6/1994 No Taped Call 
Blue Lake, ca. 1 mile south of Stryker 

Lincoln <.5mile. 9/16/1994 No Taped Call 
Fisher Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1994 No Taped Call 
Fisher Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake (NW shoreline by campground) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake outlet stream near campground 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/15/1994 No Taped Call 
S end of Island Lake, Plum Cr. Property 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No Taped Call 
North of Stillwater River Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
7 mi. up Pete Cr. Rd. @ confluence of FS Rd 6134 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
F.S. Rd. #315 Site #4 (just below milepost 16) 



80 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Ross Creek Cedars below picnic area over Ross Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Valley @ Ross Cr. turnoff & HWY 56 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
Jim's "Bog-Lemming Bog" off Sunday Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1994 No Taped Call 
Sylvan Lake Campgrounds 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #2 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Bear Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Upper Fortine Creek 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Lower Fortine Creek 



81 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln .5 to 5 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Young Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Upper Adit of Big 8 Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull Lake - south end 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Double Mac Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Luken-Hazel Mine II Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Cherry Creek Mill Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
Swamp Creek 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
Libby Rd (FS Rd 231 @ junct. with Poker Hill Rd.) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
Midas Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
FS Road 231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Mitchell Creek Mine 



82 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermiculite Mtn./Rainy Cr. -lower pond near gate 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Rest area 1 mile east of Troy 

Lincoln <.5mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 

Cow Creek #4 
Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 

Cow Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #5 



83 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/28/1995 No Taped Call 
Star Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/24/1995 No Taped Call 
French Creek #2 



84 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/19/1995 No Taped Call 
Sutton Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #4 



85 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



SILVER-HAIRED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #1 

Sanders <.5mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir (HWY 200) 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 

Rock Creek 

Sanders 5 to 10 mil / /1993 No Observation 
Lower Beaver Creek 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull River Guard Station 

BIG BROWN BAT 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 6/30/1994 No Taped Call 
Old Historic Ant Flat Ranger Station (FS Rd. 36) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No Taped Call 
Blue Lake, ca. 1 mile south of Stryker 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake (NW shoreline by campground) 



86 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/15/1994 No Taped Call 
S end of Island Lake, Plum Cr. Property 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Libby Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Creek-marsh draining Howard Lake 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
7 mi. up Pete Cr. Rd. @ confluence of FS Rd 6134 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Along Lake Koocanusa-Tobacco River 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Ross Creek Cedars below picnic area over Ross Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #3 



87 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Upper Adit of Big 8 Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull Lake - north end 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Bull Lake - south end 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Luken-Hazel Mine II Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Cherry Creek Mill Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
FSRd.231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Mitchell Creek Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Mountain View Park 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/11/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermiculite Mtn./Rainy Cr.-lower pond near gate 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Snowshoe Mine - highest open adit 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #2 



88 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/18/1995 No Taped Call 
Elk Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sunday Creek #3 



89 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/21/1995 No Taped Call 
Grave Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1995 No Taped Call 
Bog Lemming site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #6 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/27/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Hoodoo #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #4 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 1/1995 No Taped Call 
Keeler Creek #6 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/24/1995 No Taped Call 
French Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/24/1995 No Taped Call 
French Creek #2 

Lincoln <.5mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Blacktail Creek Site #5 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Rock Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Beaver #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/23/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #3 



92 



I 
I 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



BIG BROWN BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir (HWY 200) 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir @ intersection of Bull R. 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #1 

HOARY BAT 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No TapedCall 
Blue Lake, ca. 1 mile south of Stryker 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No TapedCall 
7 mi. up Pete Cr. Rd. @ confluence of FS Rd 6134 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 7/1994 No Taped Call 

F.S.Rd.#315Site#2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/17/1994 No TapedCall 
Along Lake Koocanusa-Tobacco River 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No TapedCall 
Ross Creek Cedars below picnic area over Ross Cr. 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



HOARY BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Valley @ Ross Cr. turnoff & HWY 56 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
Jim's "Bog-Lemming Bog" off Sunday Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/20/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Luken-Hazel Mine II Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/ 5/1995 No Taped Call 
Cherry Creek Mill site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
FSRd.231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/ 3/1995 No Taped Call 
Stimson Lumbar Company treatment ponds (Libby) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/ 3/1995 No Taped Call 
Mountain View Park 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #3 



94 



I 
I 



Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



HOARY BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/27/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Hoodoo #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 5/1995 No Taped Call 
Marten Creek Site #1 

TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 6/30/1994 No Taped Call 
Old Historic Ant Flat Ranger Station (FS Rd. 36) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No Taped Call 
Blue Lake, ca. 1 mile south of Stryker 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1994 No Taped Call 
Fisher Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/11/1994 No Taped Call 
Howard Lake (NW shoreline by campground) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/6/1994 No Taped Call 
North of Stillwater River Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1994 No Taped Call 
Pipe Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 

F.S.Rd.#315Site#2 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/21/1994 No Taped Call 
Parking lot & down Ross Creek Cedars Road 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/7/1994 No Taped Call 
Jim's "Bog-Lemming Bog" off Sunday Cr. 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Whitetail Campground Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1994 No Taped Call 
Yaak River Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/9/1995 No Taped Call 
Upper Adit of Big 8 Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/ 6/1995 No Taped Call 
Double Mac Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/4/1995 No Taped Call 
Luken-Hazel Mine II Site 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/5/1995 No Taped Call 
Herbert Mine 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/ 5/1995 No Taped Call 
Cherry Creek Mill Site 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/10/1995 No Taped Call 
RS Road 231 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Wolf Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/17/1995 No Taped Call 
Cow Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/14/1995 No Taped Call 
Canyon Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/15/1995 No Taped Call 
Fivemile Creek #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/13/1995 No Taped Call 
Quartz Creek #6 



97 



Natural Heritage Program 09/18/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/26/1995 No Taped Call 
Granite Creek Site #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #3 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/25/1995 No Taped Call 
Zulu Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Taped Call 
Callahan Creek #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/ 3/1995 No Taped Call 
Vermillion River #5 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Sullivan Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 7/16/1995 No Taped Call 
Pinkham Creek Rd. #1 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #2 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #3 



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Natural Heritage Program 09/1 8/1 996 

Montana Animal Atlas (Mammal) 
Species Report 

County Precision Date Breed Data Type 



TOWNSEND'S BIG-EARED BAT (continued) 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 8/22/1995 No Taped Call 
Big Creek Site #4 

Lincoln < .5 mile. 9/8/1995 No Observation 
Snowstorm Mine 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #3 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/19/1994 No Taped Call 
Bull River Site #5 

Sanders < .5 mile. 8/14/1994 No Taped Call 
Cabinet Gorge Reservoir (HWY 200) 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #1 

Sanders < .5 mile. 9/18/1994 No Taped Call 
East Fork Bull River Site #5 



99